The Rightful Place of Science: Frankenstein

The Rightful Place of Science: Frankenstein

Edited by Megan Halpern, Joey Eschrich, and Jathan Sadowski

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Two hundred years after its publication, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus continues to speak to modern concerns about science, technology, and society. The story of Victor Frankenstein and his creature has become a cultural touchstone through myriad theatrical renditions, movies, and other adaptations and allusions. But Shelley’s original tale is richer and more relevant to contemporary issues than the common interpretation of Frankenstein as a warning against scientific hubris.

Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

Frankenstein: Annotated for Scientists, Engineers, and Creators of All Kinds

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This edition of Frankenstein pairs the original 1818 version of the manuscript—meticulously line-edited and amended by Charles E. Robinson, one of the world’s preeminent authorities on the text—with annotations and essays by leading scholars exploring the social and ethical aspects of scientific creativity raised by this remarkable story. The result is a unique and accessible edition of one of the most thought-provoking and influential novels ever written.

The Dare

Two centuries ago, on a dare to tell the best scary story, 19-year-old Mary Shelley imagined an idea that became the basis for Frankenstein. Mary’s original concept became the novel that arguably kick-started the genres of science fiction and Gothic horror, but also provided an enduring myth that shapes how our society continues to grapple with creativity, science, technology, and their consequences.
Two hundred years later, inspired by that classic dare, CSI launched a series of creative challenges inspiring amateur and professional writers to reflect on questions of science, ethics, creativity, and responsibility.